book review: the foxhole court by nora sakavic

Book Review: The Foxhole Court By Nora Sakavic

(Last Updated On: August 30, 2017)

Synopsis for “The Foxhole Court” by Nora Sakavic:

“Neil Josten is the newest addition to the Palmetto State University Exy team. He’s short, he’s fast, he’s got a ton of potential—and he’s the runaway son of the murderous crime lord known as The Butcher. Signing a contract with the PSU Foxes is the last thing a guy like Neil should do. The team is high profile and he doesn’t need sports crews broadcasting pictures of his face around the nation. His lies will hold up only so long under this kind of scrutiny and the truth will get him killed. But Neil’s not the only one with secrets on the team. One of Neil’s new teammates is a friend from his old life, and Neil can’t walk away from him a second time. Neil has survived the last eight years by running. Maybe he’s finally found someone and something worth fighting for.”

Book Review:

I wasn’t really expecting that I would enjoy a book about sports. Any kind of sport. But here we are. The story is full of disasters for every character.
Neil comes in the story knowing he’s going to lie through his teeth to everyone, to his teammates and his couch. His stay with the Palmetto Exy team has an expiration date, but he just couldn’t help himself. He wants to do this one thing for himself, to do something he loves even for a short period of time, even if that brings him face to face with his past.
He’s fast.
He thinks he can outrun it.

The series is in general a well-balanced lgbt series, with both male and female characters that are just as developed. Is there romance in this series? Yes. There are hints of it, of the possibility of it in the first book, but it’s not an insta-romance, it’s a slow one. It builds over the course of the books and that’s for the best.

“It’s not the world that’s cruel. It’s the people in it.”
― Nora Sakavic, The Foxhole Court

Neil is an interesting character. He tries to keep to the persona he has create, but it’s hard for him to keep it up, especially when his past comes knocking on his door and his temper gets the better of him. He wants to believe he’s not the kind of kid who picks fights. In reality, he picks all the fights. Even the ones he can’t win.

His team are Dan wilds, the team Captain – a stripper turned athlete who has fought all her life to be where she is now, Matt Boyd – Neil’s roommate and a Backliner on the team and a former addict, Seth Gordon – a striker like Neil, who has nothing but bad attitude and family problems, as well as some pill abuse that he is supposedly over, Nicky Hemmick – another Backliner, a gay guy who was kicked out by his religious parents, Renee Walker – a Goalkeeper who says she’s a born-again Christian, Aaron – the last Backliner of the team who has endured abuse and addiction, Allioson – a Defensive Dealer, a rich girl who was disowned by her family when she chose to play sports and follow her dream, Kevin – a celebrity striker that has recently changed teams to join the Foxes after an ‘accident’, and lastly, Andrew – the prodigy Goalkeeper who is as high as a kite and has been through too much to mention here and not spoil the following books.

“As he slipped the lock into place again he realized his hand was trembling. He held up his shaky fingers where he could see them better and wondered at the equally weak flutter in his chest.”
― Nora Sakavic, The Foxhole Court

It’s obvious, that the Foxes are a mess, and that plays a very important role in the story, how this kids play off each other, how they have learned to cope with their disasters. Ultimately though it’s Neil’s story, and how he finds a new family and he learns to trust and he stops hiding behind his lies and whatnot.

Andrew is a… peculiar character. He’s a character of extremes with a very weird logic to how he does things, to how he decides what he’ll do, his reasoning for things. If you don’t like Andrew, you are not going to like this books, to be honest, because of how integral he is to the story. But he’s such a peculiar character that not everyone is going to be on board with him and what he does. He’s even somewhat of an opposing force in the first book.

Neil is not the same person that he was in the beginning of the book. He’s not trying to run away anymore, he’s decide to stay and figure things out, even when he finds out that things are far worse than he realised and that he’s past is not just going to let him go. He doesn’t only have the Butcher to worry about, he’s got to worry about Kevin and the problems he brings to them. And with Kevin, comes his guard-dog, Andrew.

Is it worth reading? Yes. It’s a character driven story, with interesting and compelling characters, the world and setting is nicely written, Exy makes sense as a sport.
Is it a perfect story? No. A lot happens in Neil’s head, he’s a kind of person who always observes the others around him, so a lot of the information get filtered through him and his point of view. The bad thing is that all this observing he does, slows down the story down sometimes.

Hope was a dangerous, disquieting thing, but he thought perhaps he liked it.”
― Nora Sakavic, The Foxhole Court

Overall, give it a shot. It’s a book worth reading and it gave me a strange urge to write a sports story…

The Foxhole Court | The Raven King | The King’s Men

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